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Inside the National Recording Registry: 2010

Each year, the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress chooses 25 recordings to be preserved for all time. Inside the National Recording Registry, produced by BMP Audio, highlights some of those selections. Our series receives production support from the Library of Congress.


61T2C9vPsvL._SL1000_Coal Miner’s Daughter

Every year the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress selects 25 recordings to be preserved for all time. One song chosen this year is Loretta Lynn’s 1970 hit “Coal Miner’s Daughter,” which tells the story of growing up poor in the Appalachian Mountains of Kentucky. Lynn, Nashville veteran Harold Ray Bradley, and Jack White of The White Stripes explain what makes the song a classic.


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R.E.M.: Radio Free Europe

Radio Free Europe” was R.E.M.’s first single. It represents a breakthrough moment, when indie rock was splitting away from punk music to become its own sound. Engineer Mitch Easter, radio manager Mike Henry, and R.E.M.’s Mike Mills look back.


295560923_da769c4d9a_bMorton Subotnick: Silver Apples of the Moon

Morton Subotnick’s Silver Apples of the Moon, was the first album of all-electronic music. Released in 1967, it found favor with electronics geeks, as well as legions of stoners who soaked in its mind-blowing sounds.


p18311kmp7oHowlin’ Wolf: Smokestack Lightning

The first song in our series is Howlin’ Wolf’s “Smokestack Lightning,” a cornerstone of Chicago Blues. Howlin’ Wolf’s daughter and his longtime guitarist Hubert Sumlin talk about the importance of his music.


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